La Romaine couple reap 20-inch ochro

long-ochro

A La Romaine couple who reaped ochroes 20 inches long are hoping to make it into the Guinness World Book of Records.

Parbatee and Harold Boodoo of Temple Street Duncan Village, San Fernando, planted the deer horn ochroes in their backyard garden six weeks ago but they never imagined that it would grow unusually long.

Ochroes usually grow to six to seven inches but on Sunday when Parbatee ventured to cut ochroes for a meal of crab and callaloo, she realized that one of the trees had an unusual bountiful harvest.

“I was very surprised. We didn’t put anything special in these trees. We just moulded the plant like usual and we put a little blaukorn fertilizer,” Parbatee said.

So what is the secret to the successful harvest? Harold said its because he talks to the plant.

“I told the ochroes to grow big and it did,” Harold laughed as his wife whacked him for telling tales.

“You never even came in the garden,” she accused.

The couple’s daughter Kimberly said based on research she did, the largest ochro came from a field in Jamaica and measured 18 inches.

When the Guardian Media measured the Boodoo’s ochroes it measured 20 inches.

Even though the Boodoos lost their chance to compete in the Guinness World Book of Records by harvesting the crop before it could be recorded, the couple believe they may be able to plant it again and strike luck twice.

Parbatee said she got the seeds from her nephew and she planned to give it away.

Harold said now that he is retired he was happy to spend his time in his garden.

He showed the media a pumpkin that was growing alongside a barbadeen plant on the same trellis.

At first glance it appeared as if the same plant was producing both barbadeen and pumpkin.

“Strange crops grow here, a pumpkin growing from a barbadeen tree and the sweetest mangoes,” Harold said giving the Guardian crew a sample.

The couple who has grandchildren said they were happy with their produce and were always happy to share their bountiful harvests.