Obama Gets Ready For Public Swearing In

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President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama stand together in the Blue Room of the White House, before a brunch celebrating the Inauguration, Jan. 18, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)
By Allison Skeete

News Americas, WASHINGTON D.C. , Sun. January 20, 2013: Temperatures in the high 40’s encouraged numbers of about 13,000 people, in addition to more than 100 service organizations, to participate in the Service Summit on the National Mall on Sunday, Jan. 20th.

People from all 50 states came together to honor the commitment to serve more than one million hours volunteering in many ways at the start of the 57th inaugural weekend honoring Dr. Martin Luther King with a National Day of Service; creating a lasting opportunity of service and marking the second historic swearing in event weekend of President Barack Obama.

Elsewhere, the preparations continue for tomorrow’s swearing in when the temperatures are supposed to drop almost or just as low as they were four years ago when the nation first saw history made with the swearing in of the 44th President of the United States of America but its first African-America. The anticipation is building for another four years in office for the second term of President Obama.

Although the official swearing in of the Vice President and the President both took place today, the public event will begin at 11:30 tomorrow morning with New York Senior Senator Charles Schumer calling the event to order with his welcome remarks.

Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of Civil Rights Leader, Medgar Evers, will give the invocation and Brooklyn’s own Brooklyn Tabernacle Choir will perform a special selection written by choir director Carol Cymabla.

Other performances will be by musicians James Taylor, Kelly Clarkson and Beyonce. While there is anticipation in the air, there are fewer crowds here for this year’s event than there were four years ago. It has been much easier to maneuver through the checkpoints and DC’s Metro stations than at the previous swearing in.
However, the general feeling is that it’s still a moment of history for most and they’re taking advantage of the chance to record it for their personal moments of posterity.