Poverty, coup legacy in play as Honduras picks new president

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Honduran presidential candidate for the Libertad y Refundacion (LIBRE) party, Xiomara Castro (C), arrives for a meeting with members of the Honduran Supreme Electoral Tribunal (TSE) in Tegucigalpa, on November 20, 2013Some 5.4 million Hondurans cast votes Sunday in a presidential election with a new chance of breaking the century-old dominance of right-wing parties. Four years after her husband was ousted in a coup, leftist Xiomara Castro, 54, is running neck-and-neck with ruling party candidate Juan Orlando Hernandez, 45. If she pulls off a win, Castro could also make history by becoming the first woman president of Honduras, one of the poorest nations in Latin America after Haiti, Bolivia and Nicaragua. And shrugging off some critics' suggestions that she might be taking orders from her husband in this male-dominated nation, Castro said Manuel Zelaya would be her top adviser, not the president.

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