FLASH BACK – When The Super Bowl Celebrated The Caribbean

SUPER-BOWL-XIII
Super Bowl XIII: Dallas Cowboys Jackie Smith (81) upset after dropping pass in endzone vs Pittsburgh Steelers Ron Johnson (29). Miami, FL 1/21/1979 CREDIT: (Photo by Tony Tomsic /Sports Illustrated via Getty Images)

By NAN Sports Editor

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News Americas, NEW YORK, NY, Fri. Jan. 31, 2020: It’s another Super Bowl weekend and Super Bowl LIV is being held in Miami, Florida, the melting pot of cultures from around the world including the Caribbean. And while there will be no Caribbean performances at this year’s half-time show, we could not help but reminisce on the time – 41 years ago – when the NFL celebrated this region at that Super Bowl event also in Miami.

The year was 1979 and the half-time and it was Super Bowl XIII. And for the first time the NFL turned its focus on the Caribbean with a half-time show titled “Super Bowl XIII Carnival” Salute to the Caribbean with Trinidadian Ken Hamilton and various Caribbean bands.”

Unfortunately, there is no video recording of the performance as there are today but we found this audio recording here.

The performance featured “Come To My Island” from BMI singer Angelina along with Hamilton as well as a number of groups.

They included Morris Mark and the Mark Five from Virgin Gorda, The Barbados Dance Theater, Wess Stars Steel Band of the Virgin Islands, Anita Ortez and the Super Nova of Aruba, the Royal Barbados Police Force, The Jamaica Military Band, The Junkanoos of the Bahamas and the Folkloric Ballet Troupe of Curacao.

It was the first and only time in the history of Super Bowl half-time performances at the annual football extravaganza.

THIS SUPER BOWL

While there will be no Caribbean performances this year, today, Friday January 31, is designated “Caribbean Day” and will consist of a mile long parade of the islands, showcasing the rich culture found across the great city.

The parade kicks off at 7 p.m. and features, Bahamian Junkanoo and Moko Jumbies, Jamaican Fashion and Folk, Haitian RaRa and Dancers, and Trinidadian Steelpan and Carnival Costumes by Euphoria Mas and popular Miami Designer, Lila Nikole.

 “Having representation from some of the Caribbean nations that make up the diversity found in Miami was a must for the Host Committee when we started to plan the program. Those communities play such an integral role in what makes Miami unique and we are honored to be able to give them a stage to be recognized.” stated Randi Freemen, Vice President/Producer, Super Bowl LIVE Events.