Meet One Of Donald Trump’s Caribbean-Born ‘Deplorable’

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A Trump Deplorable - Jamaican-born Scherie S. Murray.
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A Trump ‘Deplorable’ – Jamaican-born Scherie S. Murray.

By NAN Staff Writer

News Americas, NEW YORK, NY, Fri. Nov. 11, 2016: Eight percent of Blacks and 29 percent of Latinos voted for Donald Trump, resulting in the stunning election result seen Wednesday, Reuters/Ipsos Election Day polling data shows. Among the 59.5 million mostly white, black immigrant and Caribbean-born voters, aka, ‘Deplorables,’ who helped elect the controversial, racist, big mouth Republican is Jamaican-born Scherie S. Murray.

Murray made the disclosure on Irie Jam’s Moving Forward radio program with Irwine Clare in NYC on Wednesday evening, Nov. 9, 2016, while defending the man dubbed a bigot, a misogynist, a xenophobe, a demagogue and a con-artist.

Murray, who migrated to New York City with her family at the age of 9 and grew up in Southeast Queens, NY, said Trump will look out for the Caribbean and especially Jamaica when he becomes President and those who did not vote for him need to heal the divide and give him a chance.

Murray, who was elected to the New York Republican State Committee in 2013 as District Leader and State Committee Woman of the 29th Assembly District in Queens, N.Y., said she believes the Caribbean needs to be represented on the other side and she will do her best to represent the interests of the region and her homeland with the new administration.

Murray’s appearance on the show and comments triggered heated responses from callers who were aghast that the black immigrant woman could even think of supporting Trump much less defending him.

But host Irwine Clare deftly calmed the mostly Democratic immigrant callers, insisting Murray’ is entitled to her opinion and to her political choice.

A breakdown of the ‘Deplorables’ who voted for Trump show that despite calling Mexicans “rapists” and “killers” – garnered more support from Hispanics than Mitt Romney in 2012, whose most controversial position was telling undocumented immigrants to “self-deport.” He also performed better among African American voters than a considerably more moderate Republican nominee despite linking blacks to “inner city” slums and crime at his election rallies.

Still, Trump faces a deeply divided nation. NBC News Exit Polls also found that two-thirds of Asian, black and Hispanic voters say they are “scared” with the idea of Trump in the Oval Office.