Meet The Caribbean Woman Leading Morgan Stanley’s Global Diversity Efforts

susan-reid-morgan-stanley
Jamaican Susan K. Reid is currently the Global Head of Diversity and Inclusion at Morgan Stanley.
susan-reid-morgan-stanley
Jamaican Susan K. Reid is currently the Global Head of Diversity and Inclusion at Morgan Stanley.

By NAN Business Editor

News Americas, NEW YORK, NY, Fri. April 15, 2016: Caribbean immigrants may have no accurate way to count themselves on U.S. Census forms but when it comes to contributions to the United States, there is no denying they are at every strata. At American multinational financial services corporation Morgan Stanley it is no different.

Leading the charge on global diversity and inclusion is none other than a Caribbean immigrant who migrated to the U.S. in 1979.

Jamaican Susan K. Reid is currently the Global Head of Diversity and Inclusion at the company, holding responsibility for firm-wide diversity and inclusion efforts that drive the hiring, retention, development and advancement of a diverse group of employees.

Reid earned a bachelor’s degree in economics and political science from New York University after moving to the U.S. and then worked her way up from assistant director of Student Affairs and Minority Student Services at N.Y.U. to more than 15 years of diversity, recruiting, and human resources functions at Marsh and McLennan Cos., RR Donnelley, Bell Atlantic, to her current position.

She joined Morgan Stanley in 2008 as a human resource business partner in the Investment Management division. Today she is also a member of the firm’s Multicultural Client Strategy Committee and the Morgan Stanley Foundation Board of Directors.

Her background includes experience advising senior leaders on a broad range of talent management issues including talent acquisition, talent development, compensation and diversity.

She was recently presented with The Network Journal’s 25 Influential Black Women in Business Award, which honors top women executives whose professional achievements have significantly impacted an industry or profession, and who also have made an important contribution to their community.

Reid told the Journal that she is guided by her mother’s work ethic and a personal belief system that emphasizes well-being, which she defines as being physically and mentally well, fostering resilience, and maintaining strong family ties and friendships that sustain you.

“Work is important to well-being and well-being is important to work. You can’t trade one for the other,” she was quoted as saying.  “I saw it both as a physical goal but also as a metaphor for life; life, after all, is like a marathon.”