Black Voters Help Deliver For Bill de Blasio – But Election Still Too Close To Call

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Bill de Blasio addressing supporters during his election night celebration, Sept. 10, 2013. (NY 1 image)
News Americas, NEW YORK, NY, Weds. Sept. 11, 2013: Black voters, including Caribbean Americans or West Indians gave Public Advocate Bill de Blasio an edge in Tuesday’s September 10th Democratic Mayoral Primary election, exit polls show.

Exit polling conducted by Edison Media Research for The Associated Press and other news organizations showed the Brooklyn resident an edge in all five boroughs over former comptroller Bill Thompson, the only African-American candidate in the race.

De Blasio (@BilldeBlasio), who was endorsed by News Americas, not only won with black voters but with with female voters as well but as of today, it was unclear whether he has enough votes to avoid a run off.

With 97 percent of precincts reporting, de Blasio has about 40.2 percent of the total vote while Thompson has 26 percent. City Council Speaker Christine Quinn has 15 percent. They were followed by current city Comptroller John Liu at 7 percent and former sexting congressman Anthony Weiner at 5 percent.

If de Blasio cannot hold above the 40 percent threshold, he would face Thompson in an October 1 run-off. Election officials will recount the votes and tabulate absentee ballots, and it may take more than a week before it is known whether a runoff is needed.

Turnout appeared light, but the city’s complaint line received several thousand voting-related calls. Many reported jams and breakdowns in the antiquated lever machines, which were hauled out of retirement to replace much-maligned electronic devices.

Meanwhile, the Republican Primary was much more clear cut with Joe Lotha, the former MTA chairman, last night capturing 52 percent of the vote to John Catsimatidis’ 41 percent.

And in the Democratic city comptroller race, Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer defeated Eliot Spitzer, 52 percent to 48 percent, ending the former governor’s attempt at a political comeback.

A run-off election is set in the Democratic primary for public advocate between state Senator Daniel Squadron and City Councilwoman Letitia James. James captured 36 percent of the vote to Squadron’s had 33 percent.

Yesterday’s election also featured an unexpected outcome with Brooklyn District Attorney Charles Hynes being beaten challenger Ken Thompson in the primary election. Hynes, who has served as Brooklyn DA since 1990, received 45 percent of the vote to Thompson’s 55 percent. The two will now clash in November.