What Does This Reggae Pop Band And The Kavanaugh Investigation Have In Common?

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Ali Campbell says 'It Wasn't Me' on Kavanaugh.

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By NAN ET Editor

News Americas, NEW YORK, NY, Fri. Oct. 5, 2018: As protests and controversy continues to swirl over the confirmation of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, one reggae-pop band has gotten caught up in the mix, much to its surprise.

UB40 has found itself linked somewhat to Kavanaugh after a report in the New York Times, the fight began when, after going to see a UB40 concert in 1985, Kavanaugh and his friends mistook a man in a Connecticut bar for the band’s lead singer, Ali Campbell.

The man reportedly told them to stop looking at him and he was not the person they thought he was. But Kavanaugh allegedly took offense to the man’s demeanor, cursed him and then threw a beer in his face. A brawl followed, which resulted in the police being called, and one of Kavanaugh’s friends being arrested.

Campbell, meanwhile, wrote in The Guardian on Tuesday that when he first heard that his band was obliquely involved in Kavanaugh’s alleged 1985 bar brawl mentioned in a police report, the story was completely new to him.

“I first found out that my name was being dragged into the biggest news story of the year when I woke up and my wife came in and said: ‘What’s all this about you and Brett Kavanaugh?’” he wrote. “I said: ‘I have absolutely no idea.’ Then people started ringing up asking for a comment on this supposed ruckus in a bar between him and someone who looked like me in 1985. My obvious comment is: ‘It wasn’t me!’”

UB40 is best known for its cover of the Neil Diamond hit “Red Red Wine,” which they play over a Jamaican reggae drum beat.

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